You’ve likely met this super-power of an herb out on a hike and didn’t necessarily think of it too fondly. I still remember the hike where my little guy (when he was about 2) had a run in with it and got quite the rash. Thankfully nettle stings are usually short-lived.

 

So, it may not be something you think of as nourishing, but honestly, nettle is a powerhouse. I’m surprised it hasn’t been deemed a super-food yet. I was out of my nettle tea and infusion for a couple of months and just finally got some back in the house. I definitely missed it and noticed my energy waning. In addition to supporting your energy, there are a host of other benefits:

 

  • Rebuilds the kidneys and helps dissolve gravel or stones
  • Decreases seasonal allergies
  • Rebuilds and strengthens the adrenals
  • Improves fasting blood glucose and A1c numbers
  • Reduces inflammation
  • Strengthens bones with its high content of calcium and magnesium
  • Improves blood circulation
  • Strengthens and tones blood vessels
  • Stimulates gastric juices for better digestion
  • Stimulates the flow of bile for a healthy liver and gallbladder
  • Rich in vitamins: Niacin, riboflavin, thiamine and choline, vitamin C and vitamin K
  • Rich in minerals: iron, calcium, potassium, silicon, magnesium, manganese, zinc and chromium

 

That’s quite the resume for one very unassuming herb.

 

How to use it:

 

Tea:

To get started with nettle, pick up a box of Traditional Medicine’s Nettle Tea and try a cup. This is a very mild version and is an easy place to start incorporating it into your day.

 

Infusion:

 

To really feel the benefits of nettle, you need a much stronger version than just a cup of tea. (Although don’t discount the benefits of at least a cup of tea if that’s all you can do!) An infusion uses a lot of herbs and a much longer steeping time to significantly increase the amount of minerals and nutrients in each cup. Buy nettle in bulk here or here or here.

 

1-2 Cups Nettles

4 Cups boiling water

 

Pour boiling water over desired amount of herbs and allow to steep 2-4 hours (or overnight!). I use a 4-cup Pyrex measuring cup for this part. Then strain and refrigerate in glass ball jars and enjoy within 2 days. 

 

Start with 1 cup of nettles and work up to 2 cups as you get accustomed to the flavor. An infusion makes a MUCH stronger flavor.

 

Take the Challenge

 

Nettle builds strength in the body from the inside out. Drink 4-5 quarts of the nettle infusion each week for at least 3 weeks to see a difference in stamina and strength. Want to try it for 3 weeks? See what happens? Now is the time of year when we could all use a little extra energy. This is a simple self-care practice you can add in right away without overwhelming you.

 

Want to take the challenge? Connect with others taking the challenge too? Head on over to my brand new Facebook group and join! I’ll be doing a live demonstration of how to make the Nettle Infusion on Monday at 2pm EST. Pop in, say hello and let us know if you are going to try the challenge.

 

See you there!

References:

De La Foret, R. (2017). Alchemy of Herbs. Carlsbad, California: Hay House, Inc.

Gladstar, Rosemary. (2008). Rosemary Gladstar’s Herbal Recipes for Vibrant Health. Massachusetts: Storey Publishing.

Weed, S. (1986). Wise Woman Herbal for the Childbearing Year. New York: Art Tree Publishing.